The Work of the Union - IUAI Representation

Representation of Members’ interests to legislators and regulators is arguably the most important function of a trade association. This was recognised even at the very first meeting of the Union back in 1934 when the Chairman agreed to write to the Comité International Technique d’Experts Juridique Aériens (CITEJA), IATA, the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI) and numerous other bodies, informing them of the Union’s formation. CITEJA became the Legal Committee of the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) in 1947, and the Union has worked closely with both ICAO and IATA ever since.

Over the years the Union has achieved accredited observer status with the United Nations, ICAO, the European Civil Aviation Conference (ECAC), the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), and the Organisation of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and has developed close links with the European Commission and the Comité Européen des Assurance (CEA – now Insurance Europe).

The Union has a history of partnership with other trade associations and bodies on specific issues where the interests of those third parties align with those of the Union’s membership. Experience has shown that where insurers, and their clients or other industry organisations, share a common position then a joint approach provides a balanced and therefor often more credible message to governments and regulators.

To date, The Union has provided advice and expert opinion on insurance matters to the various ICAO Study Groups, Committees and Diplomatic Conferences set up to develop the following Conventions:

  • Rome Convention 1952, relating to third party damage on the ground.
  • Montreal Protocol 1978, modifying the Rome Convention of 1952.
  • Montreal Convention 1999, which was designed to replace the liability regime of the Warsaw Convention 1929.
  • Globaltime 2001, which was an ICAO initiative to establish a non-profit insurance vehicle, funded by participating States, to cover terrorism risks.  This failed to gain sufficient States’ support.
  • European Regulation 785/2004, on third party liability insurance requirements for aircraft operators
  • Montreal Conventions 2009, covering third party damage on the ground caused by unlawful interference (Unlawful Interference Convention) and general risks (General Risks Convention).

More recently, the Union has been involved in ongoing discussions with Regulators and Governments on issues including:

  • The Legal and regulatory framework for the development of UAV operations, and the challenges and opportunities that these operations bring to the insurance sector.
  • Input to the FAA regarding potential liability limits for space launch certification from US launch sites.

The Union will continue to work on behalf of its members, both unilaterally and in association with other groups and industry bodies, to ensure that the views of the aerospace insurance sector are properly represented.

 

AGM


Join us in Taormina, Italy
4 - 8 June 2017